The president, where is she?

The president, according to her aides cannot attend the joint session of the House of Representatives and the Senate that hears the legality of the Martial Law declared in Maguindanao. To quote her minions, she cannot personally defend the declaration because  “she’s busy”.

Plain and simple.

Now let us try to dissect the definition, etymology, subtexts, subtleties, and hidden meanings of this simple English word, busy. Afterwards, we’ll decide for ourselves whether the president’s excuse is justified.

Etymology: Middle English bisy, from Old English bisig; akin to Middle Dutch & Middle Low German besich busy
Date: before 12th century. (The word is rather old, Germanic. Using this as an excuse, might have been started by old Germanic tribes. The word used as an excuse is trite and and has long lost its meaning.)

1 a : engaged in action : occupied (with actions of sinister character) b : being in use  (the president is maudlin)

2 : full of activity : bustling (her personal economy is)

3 : foolishly or intrusively active : meddling (been uncontrollably meddling with this country’s development since 2001)

4 : full of distracting detail (sight of her in nightly news programs is annoying at best, death-inducing at worst)

synonyms busy, industrious, diligent, assiduous, sedulous mean actively engaged or occupied. busy chiefly stresses activity as opposed to idleness or leisure (too busy with her shady deals that only her malfeasance is felt). industrious implies characteristic or habitual devotion to work (what work?). diligent suggests earnest application to some specific object or pursuit (pursuit to forward only her and her family’s interest). assiduous stresses careful and unremitting application (indeed she is assiduous in conducting her evil doings). sedulous implies painstaking and persevering application (she sedulously and schemingly transformed this country to a failed state.)

http://www.merriam-webster.com

Is there any responsibility of the president at this point that is more important than having to explain the reason why Malacanang declared Martial Law in Maguindanao? Now show us where that woman is hiding.

Adjective

busy (comparative busier, superlative busiest)

  1. Doing a great deal; having a lot of things to do in the space of time given
    It has been a busy day.
  2. Engaged in another activity or by someone else.
    The director cannot see you now, he’s busy.
    Her telephone has been busy all day.
  3. Having a lot going on; complicated or intricate.
    Flowers, stripes, and checks in the same fabric make for a busy pattern.

[edit] Related terms

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